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Agenda

For detailed information on each day's sessions and events, please see below.

Key for Session Streams

Parks Quality Management Rural Trends Inclusion Active Aging Design General



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Course #1413530

Psychological First Aid Instructors support the delivery of our Psychological First Aid Course. Candidates will develop competencies in facilitating case-based learning, and how to support learners in understanding a resiliency-building approach to emotional, psychological, and social wellbeing. Certified Instructors may teach Psychological First Aid Courses through Training Partners who are offering the program across the country. 

Pre-requisites: Fundamentals of Instruction Online (access provided if you do not currently have it prior to the course; PFA certification (recommended); PFA - Self-Care (Online); PFA - Care for Others (Online). Must be 18 years of age. 
*Two PFAI's are required to teach a Psychological First Aid course regardless of the number of registered participants. We recommend having two or more members of your community trained in PFAI.
**There will be a mandatory Teaching Experience required to be completed after the course.
Instructor: TBD
Price: $300,  inlcludes tax and course materials. Lunch not included.
Registration: Please register at https://bit.ly/2RY5wpn or by calling 1-877-356-3226



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The Principles of Healthy Child Development (PHCD) is a four-hour training that equips front-line leaders (anyone working with children aged 6 to 12 - i.e. camp counsellor, coaches, after school staff, swim instructors) with the tools required to immediately enhance the quality of the programs they are leading. Using the HIGH FIVE Principles of Healthy Child Development, front-line leaders will be able to ensure each child’s social, emotional, physical and cognitive needs are met while designing and delivering programs. After this training, leaders will have a new set of knowledge, activities and resources to be able to enhance their relationships with children, speak a common language with their fellow staff and be able to create a child-centred program.


Price: $42 plus HST, includes course materials. Lunch not included.

Click on the Register button at the top of this page to add this to your conference registration or register for this course only.



Networking Events, Welcome & Opening Keynote

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First time at PRO’s Forum? This is the perfect opportunity to get acquainted with your fellow delegates. First Timers are welcome to bring a friend. By invitation only event.


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Still Laughing after 25 years
Kick off your conference experience with Colin Mochrie (Whose Line Is It Anyway?) and Debra McGrath (Little Mosque on the Prairie) and their hilarious and acclaimed ‘One Couple Show.” Based on 25-plus years of marriage (think PRO’s special anniversary!), 60 years of performing around the world, and a year on Instagram, this fast-paced show skillfully weaves heartwarming life stories with audience-inspired improv and surprise video guests. Enjoy the laughs as Colin and Deb entertain with their charm, wit, and promise of cash prizes.


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Following the opening keynote, join us at a casual reception with the entire delegation. There will be the opportunity to participate in networking activities or you can catch up with contacts. After 25 years, trust us to get your learning journey off to a good start – we’re “PROs” at it!

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In the last 50 years, Parks and Recreation has passed through six eras: activity and custodial; promotion and selling; user benefits; community benefits; passive repositioning; and active repositioning. Although the six eras occurred chronologically, many agencies and managers operate as if their thinking were guided by earlier eras. An agency’s future viability depends on its success in actively repositioning its worth in the minds of elected officials and taxpayers. At this session, you’ll learn about the characteristics of each era and then be invited to consider which era drives your work.
John Crompton, University Distinguished Professor, Texas A&M University, and College Station Councilman, Texas


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Designing for inclusivity has become a hot topic and an aspirational goal for many operators of public and community buildings. Each design response brings its own inclusion challenges, typically generated by the question “Who is included?” This presentation will examine local and international examples that identify the “who,” support various types of inclusion through design and materials and ensure successful place-making through programming and public outreach. Discover the strengths and weaknesses of efforts to address differing inclusivity goals, including universal change rooms, polyvalent public spaces and daytime versus nocturnal uses. Learn how factors such as location, demographics, and prevailing social structures influence outcomes.
Gary Sanger, Community Recreation Supervisor, City of Toronto; Robert Allen, Partner, MJMA Architects; Tarisha Dolyniuk, Design Principal, Perkins+Will


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Troy Sykes brings a unique perspective on how parks services (and support for those services) can improve with the availability of quantifiable and qualifiable data. In his former work with a larger Canadian municipality, Troy filled out the Yardstick Parks Benchmarking Tool and used the information gleaned from that tool; now he has moved to the other side of the fence as the new Canadian Director of the municipal parks measurement tool. In his former role, he used the tool to help determine what parks assets were needed where for appropriate and sustainable levels of services. He also used the information gleaned through the tool to better engage customer and external stakeholders in parks planning discussions and to communicate with City Council during budget deliberations regarding the need for parks development and the consequences of asset depletion. Benefit from Troy’s specific experience as well as his birds-eye view of how others are using the Yardstick Parks Benchmarking Tool.
Troy Sykes, Canadian Director, XYST Canada (founder of the Yardstick Parks Benchmarking Tool)


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Managing Inappropriate Behaviour by Creating an Environment for Children to Succeed
Escalating demands on staff to deal with children’s challenging behaviours prompted the City of Ottawa to develop a policy on how to respond when a program participant is in breach of the terms and conditions of enrollment. Designed from the ground up, the policy gives clear direction to everyone from frontline staff through to senior management. A step-by-step process ensures clear lines of communication among all involved, from the participant to guardians, onsite supervisors, and senior managers. Initially designed to suspend and/or withdraw a participant, this approach has evolved into a tool for creating an environment for a child to succeed and remain in programs. Initial skepticism has given way to widespread acceptance of the process. This session will cover the policy and procedures, the statistics gathered in five years since implementation, new trainings based on those statistics, and results achieved—including more integrated planning with our Inclusive Recreation department.
Pat Daly, Portfolio Manager, City of Ottawa; Matthew Perkins, Recreation Supervisor, City of Ottawa


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Generation X. Also called the sandwich generation, they can be the forgotten ones, bridging the gap between millennials and boomers. Now in their 40s and 50s, they’re precariously sandwiched, simultaneously supporting both children and parents. But the parks and recreation industry must not overlook the magnitude of Generation X buying power and influence on other generations. Explore 10 strategic reasons why your agency should remember the forgotten generation.
Dannielle Wilson, Senior Consultant/Business Development Specialist, BerryDunn, Business Accounting, Audits, Consulting, Maine


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In this seminar, learn how to evaluate your recreation programs using parameters such as policy and procedures, safety and supervision, administration, customer service communication, and interactions with participants and parents. Find out how and what to begin tracking as soon as a program begins, how to log success, and how to make modifications throughout. Discover ways to address areas of celebration and improvement with part-time staff, site coordinators and senior staff toward the shared goal of top quality programs.
Anthony DeLaurentis, Community Recreation Programmer, City of Toronto


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Through strategic planning, Tiny Township received numerous requests for seniors' services. In 2016, staff successfully applied for provincial funding to offer active programming to seniors, specifically pickleball, shuffleboard, and bocce ball. The pickleball programming generated great interest, leading to the development of drop-in program with equipment borrowed from other municipalities. As participation grew, the township marked out more courts, offered more sessions, and eventually added pickleball to the municipal budget. Now Tiny had its own pickleball equipment but still could not keep up with growth. So volunteers were recruited and trained to serve as program and league leaders. Those volunteers now run a vibrant league and drop-in program whose members also participate in local tournaments. Tiny’s tennis courts were recently resurfaced and include lines for six pickleball courts; an initial small core group of players has grown into 50-plus registrants. Building on that momentum, in 2017 staff obtained federal funding to develop a local aging plan, which identified need for social participation, respect and inclusion, and skill building. Staff were asked to consider an art cooperative circle. Thanks again to volunteer engagement, training, and marketing, Tiny now hosts a vibrant and active cooperative circle. Up to 30 women participate in a weekly drop-in program where they create amazing art.
Emma Clench, Community Recreation Coordinator, Township of Tiny; Maggie Off, Community Engagement Coordinator, Township of Tiny

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To ensure quality in service delivery, the Ontario Camps Association and HIGH FIVE National have worked hard to develop accreditation standards. If your organization is accredited in one area, attend this session to find out how you can achieve the second accreditation without doing twice the work. Learn how these accreditations complement each other so that the children in your care are safe, healthy, and well-supported in their personal development.
Heather Davidson, HIGH FIVE Trainer, Parks and Recreation Ontario, and Board Member, Ontario Camps Association

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Labosport Canada is a testing laboratory dedicated to sports surfaces testing, consulting and research across Canada. It is concerned with ensuring the surfaces on sports fields meets the needs and expectations of those who are using them. While much of their work deals with testing to prevent injuries, such as traumatic brain-related injuries like concussion, its research also deals with system components, alternate infill, and quality control. This session will help you better understand how to mitigate risk on all types of surfaces (synthetic turf, natural grass, athletic tracks, indoor gymnasiums, etc.) and work to make your space a safer place to play.
Luc Poirier, Commercial Director, Labosport Canada






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Creativity is the key to an agency’s ongoing viability, yet creativity is too often inadvertently stifled by negative administrative and managerial procedures. This session identifies the processes, structures, and characteristics that nurture innovation, the factors frequently found in agencies that inhibit innovation, and specific action managers at all levels can take to build a pervasive culture for innovation in parks and recreation departments and other recreation service delivery groups.
John Crompton, University Distinguished Professor, Texas A&M University, and College Station Councilman, Texas


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Parks can build strong connections between neighbours, but these positive social benefits don’t just happen. Creating the conditions for parks that foster social cohesion takes investments in engagement, amenities, programming, and community capacity. With rising social isolation and increasing polarization, social cohesion is a critical issue. Park People’s Sparking Change program—based on original research into the social impacts of park engagement—works specifically with communities in low income, newcomer neighbourhoods. The program has built an inclusive engagement model that provides capacity building support, leadership training, and small grants to residents for park animation and improvement projects, such as tree plantings and festivals. This presentation will highlight the research into the social impacts of parks, the strategies that can be used to ensure inclusive engagement, and case studies involving Sparking Change projects.
Ayal Dinner, Program Manager, Parks People; Minaz Asani-Kanji, Outreach Manager, Park People

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Attend this session for an update about recent activities of the Green Infrastructure Ontario (GIO) Coalition, which has a focus on parks. The session will include an overview of the findings of the recent “State of Large Parks in Ontario’s Golden Horseshoe” report.
Jennifer Court, Executive Director, Green Infrastructure Ontario Coalition


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It was time to update the City of Grapevine’s Park and Recreation Master Plan. There was only one problem: no money in the budget to hire a firm. Staff brainstormed ways to update the plan, and at the end of the day, all agreed: “We can do this in-house.” The goal was to produce an unbiased, World-Class Master Plan representing the views of everyone in the community. Attend this session to learn the process and approach Grapevine took to achieve that audacious goal.
Amanda Rodriguez, Marketing Manager, City of Grapevine, Texas; Kevin Mitchell, Director of Parks and Recreation, City of Grapevine, Texas


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Among youth in Ontario, the use of e-cigarettes is growing. So are the many concerns associated with the popularity of vaping, particularly regarding nicotine levels. Beyond health concerns, this session will explore the explosion of youth vaping in Ontario through social, cultural, and industry-fueled lenses. You’ll hear a brief overview of the technology of e-cigarettes and have a hands-on opportunity to explore various products used by youth. Discover the factors behind this challenging behaviour as well as its health and legal implications. Find out how best to prevent uptake and to support youth in these changing, vaping times. Take home a list of resources available to support young people and adult influencers in making healthy decisions.
Corina Artuso, Youth Engagement Coordinator, Algoma Public Health; Heather McCully, Youth Engagement Coordinator, City of Hamilton, Public Health Services


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It has been more than six years since the concept of active outdoor play began to re-emerge as a priority at the City of Calgary. Come hear about how play in this city has evolved over that time as an outgrowth of the Calgary Play Charter. Learn about “loose parts play,” which invites children to carry, combine, put together, and take apart moveable objects in multiple ways; and find out how you can use “how-to” guides developed in partnership with the Alberta Recreation and Parks Association, Government of Alberta and the University of Alberta. View the collaborative work of YYC Plays and Calgary Recreation Play integration projects, which illustrate what the measurement and collective impact of play look like. See how HIGH FIVE and play ambassadors fit within the emerging play programming.
AJ Matsune, Recreation Program Coordinator - Active Foundations, City of Calgary, AB


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Do your fitness programs attract active agers? This session will begin by reviewing current senior fitness practices and offerings, while also debunking common myths about aging and exercise. Next, you’ll learn key components for offering 30- to 60-minute programs that not only help participants achieve Canada’s physical activity guidelines but set your organization apart and attract active agers. Take home specific ways to increase engagement, adherence, and referral by engaging participants across the six domains of wellness: physically, socially, emotionally, intellectually, spiritually and purposefully. This component will include an interactive portion where participants will see and feel the difference between a traditional senior fitness program and one that is reinvented using StrongerU Senior Fitness principles. Finally, learn strategies for attracting active agers to your programs and driving attendance through key messaging, advertising strategies, and promotion. This session is designed for anyone teaching or programming for seniors, as well as those involved with managing and developing recreation programs.
Emily Johnson, Founder and Creative Director, StrongerU Senior Fitness

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As Canada’s largest volunteer centre, Volunteer Toronto has what it takes to enhance your playbook with leading practices and resources in sport volunteer management. Keep your focus on the game and not on whether you have enough help behind the scenes or on the sidelines. This session will include: how to engage potential volunteers; an overview of the recruitment process; effective screening (applications, interviews, references); and how to keep great volunteers motivated by breaking down barriers. This session is relevant to those who are directly involved with sports as well as those who support sport groups and organizations.
Joanne McKiernan, Executive Director (Acting), Volunteer Toronto

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Walk the aisles at Canada’s largest parks and recreation trade show with exhibitors from across North America. Find out what’s new and innovative that will help set you apart in your administration, service delivery, facilities and outdoor spaces. More than just a trade show, this event includes unique activation sites, delicious food and the opportunity to win fantastic prizes.

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Rowan’s Law, enacted in 2018, created concussion awareness and management rules for sport and recreation organizations, coaches, instructors, officials, athletes, and their parents. As the first jurisdiction in Canada to pass concussion safety legislation, Ontario is a national leader. What does the law mean for you and your programs? Attend this session for an overview of the legislation, clarification about who must comply, and tips on where to access free resources and training. Rowan Stringer, for whom the new law is named, continued playing after experiencing multiple concussions, not knowing her brain needed time to heal. Together, we can ensure she did not die in vain.
From the Ministry of Heritage, Sport Tourism and Culture Industries: Susan Golets, Director, Policy Branch; Daniela Kiguel, Senior Policy Coordinator, Policy Branch


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Making a splash with HIGH FIVE! There is no doubt that “dry” and “wet” programming is different in many ways however, the principles of HIGH FIVE are still very relevant to ensure a quality participant centered approach. The City of St. John’s systematically introduced HIGH FIVE into aquatics programming in their QUEST for accreditation with so many positive outcomes, including increased respect and job knowledge between aquatics and children’s program teams.
Annette Oldford, Recreation Program Supervisor, City of St. John’s, NL


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Imagine Recreation & Parks services 20 years from now. What will they look like? Well aware that the municipal landscape is shifting, the City of Toronto has been imagining a future with different demographics, technology, resource limitations, workforce, and more. Developing a “Transformation Agenda” can help focus and mobilize the right kind of change. How best to plan and develop recreational spaces and parks? Plan and deliver service? Attract and develop talent? Modernize to more efficiently meet the changing needs of communities, customers, and stakeholders? This session will profile outcomes and lessons learned through recent City of Toronto transformation initiatives, including shared use facilities; innovative park redevelopment; alternate service models; technology and business re-engineering. Participants will be invited to share their own transformational initiatives and goals. Be prepared to be inspired and energized about the "possible."
Janie Romoff, General Manager, Parks, Recreation & Forestry, and Ann-Marie Nasr, Director, Parks, Development and Capital Projects, City of Toronto


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Humans are dependent on natural ecosystems for survival, yet we have only fragmented understanding of these crucial connections. Despite growing evidence and awareness of the benefits ecosystems provide to the health and well-being of our communities, we continue to see loss and degradation of green spaces. Many sectors have roles to play in improving both health and ecosystem outcomes, including parks, public health, medicine, social services, education, land use planning, environment, forestry, and watershed management. We need to work together to break down silos, make good use of scarce resources, and achieve synergies that will lead to improved health outcomes for current and future Ontarians. EcoHealth Ontario has been developing new relationships among these various sectors and building a common agenda to foster improved health and well-being outcomes for Ontarians through better ecosystem quality, increased greenspace, and enhanced access to nature. This workshop will address the growing challenges faced by communities and agencies: growth pressures, climate change impacts (worsened by lack of greenspace and green infrastructure), inequity in access to greenspace, increasing prevalence of chronic physical and mental health illnesses (which could be alleviated by healthier natural environments). Delegates will learn about EcoHealth Ontario’s mandate and activities and explore opportunities to collaborate on actions to improve health outcomes for all ages through healthier ecosystems and meaningful access to greenspace.
Pegeen Walsh, Executive Director, Ontario Public Health Association


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For managers and department heads, building an effective team means understanding what they bring to the game and how they best need to be coached. What they bring is not just the skills they’ve learned in their previous and current jobs, but also their lived experiences. Style of Influence testing and other analytic measures help managers and directors understand their employees’ strengths, weaknesses, what motivates them and the balance they need in a team. Using analytics allows leadership to build better teams and create mentorship opportunities that cultivates growth and success in your organization.
Kevin Mitchell, Director of Parks and Recreation, City of Grapevine, Texas


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The way we think about a problem always determines the sorts of solutions we seek. A manager who asks, “How can I get my staff to do what I tell them?” will come up with a very different solution than a manager who asks, "How can I motivate my people to work toward common goals?” Each of these managers is dealing with the same issue but coming at it from a very different direction—and their point of view has a huge influence on what happens next. Each day our employees face problems they must solve. As each problem presents itself, a small voice helps them think about the problem (and the eventual solution). Every employer’s goal is to help all our employees hear the same voice but also to ensure the voice is always helpful. Creating that corporate culture is the challenge for every manager, and it’s the basis of great customer service. This presentation focuses on ways to help create that small voice so that your people are asking the right questions and coming up with the right answers.
Ron McCarville, Professor, Recreation and Leisure Studies, University of Waterloo


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Equip your camp staff with amazing games, whether for summer camps or school-break sessions, and your community will reap the benefits. Games that actively engage youth bring joy and increase mental health. What’s more, those games can inject new energy into youth programs. Attend this session for a hands-on opportunity to use traditional equipment innovatively—and to try out innovative equipment, some of which will be given away to workshop participants. Actively experience new games that will spin off into other creative ideas as you share what you’ve learned with staff and clients.
John Byl, Canadian Sport Educational Consultant, Gopher Sport


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From designing a playground to composing a comprehensive master plan, national standards indicate that that we should engage the community in our planning processes. So, we dutifully conduct focus groups and statistically valid surveys and rely on responses from those who choose to actively participate. What about those who don’t respond? Who are they? What do they have to say? This session proposes that there are segments of your community with “silent voices,” and that it is our job to find and engage them. Join us to explore eight “pulse strategies” and create a plan that will help you listen to and engage with diverse perspectives in your community.
Dannielle Wilson, Senior Consultant/Business Development Specialist, BerryDunn, Business Accounting, Audits, Consulting, Maine


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Price segmentation is the strategy of charging different users different prices for the same service. It is the key to balancing the two foundational principles upon which pricing public recreation and park services rests: the Benefit Principle and the Ability to Pay Principle. The session will discuss the relative merits of 12 discounted premium mechanisms that can be used to achieve this balance. It will demonstrate that optimizing revenue by capturing consumer surplus and optimizing social equity to ensure full inclusion are not mutually exclusive outcomes.
John Crompton, University Distinguished Professor, Texas A&M University, and College Station Councilman, Texas





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A veteran of nearly three decades in recreation and parks delivery,research, and planning, Joe Pavelka is keen to share what he has learned. During the Ralph Klein era of severe budget cuts in Alberta, he took a unique leadership role in restructuring public recreation and parks, including three years as assistant director of Calgary Parks & Recreation. Almost 25 years later, Ontario is among the jurisdictions experiencing similar constraints. What worked in Alberta? What would Joe do differently today? This keynote begins with context: Does your budget reduction call for tweaking? Dangerous tweaking? Reinvention? Joe will then introduce a four-part model (mandate-relevance-sustainability-flexibility) that
equips managers to identify scope creep and predict whether a particular course of action will advance agency priorities. He’ll describe measures taken in 1990s Alberta, including a
now-infamous partnership with the YMCA that did not work, yet impacted the way recreation and parks services are delivered today. In closing, Joe will situate Ontario’s current context within the four-part model, using lessons from the past to inform the future.

Joe Pavelka, PhD, Professor, Mount Royal University, Principal, Planvision International Ltd.



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Enjoy a special anniversary refreshment and take a poster walk that tells stories of some of the great activities, events and developments that have taken place over the last 25 years in the parks and recreation sector. And join fellow delegates for a last chance to visit the trade show booths, participate in the activation areas, and win some great prizes.


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Networking is critical at senior management and elected officials’ levels as it creates opportunities to share ideas, learn about industry trends, and make collegial connections. This casual “by invitation only” event will see those in municipal parks and recreation, not-for-profit, and other sector leaders meet, greet and expand their professional networks and reminisce about the advancements over the past 25 years.


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Take this opportunity to meet up with friends and sample the exquisite food at one of the many restaurants in the Blue Mountain Village. From steak to sushi, or pizza to pasta, it’s all there for you! Enjoy, and gear up for the evening’s social event.


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It’s more than a year to celebrate PRO’s 25th... it’s also a year to celebrate the 2020 Summer Olympics! Pick a sport, build a team or get ready for an individual event. Come in your best sports gear to join in some off-the-wall “sports” where everyone is a winner! Join the event as a participant or comes as a spectator, but at this event, networking is a mandatory – and fun – sport!







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This session will illustrate the important role data can play in program planning, using the City of Brampton as a jumping-off point. Presenters will outline the mix of data sources used for recreation planning in Brampton, focusing especially on the capabilities and applications of current analytical tools. The city’s planning analysts apply a range of analytics to track trends, identify opportunities and threats, and prioritize projects and tasks. Consider how you might use insights gleaned from data sources in your community for comparative analysis, benchmarking, modeling, and program optimization.
Ivan Ho, Recreation Planning Analyst, City of Brampton; Samantha Yee, Recreation Business Advisor, City of Brampton


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Looking for funding? Seeking new way to excite your community about your parks and programming? Here’s your opportunity to learn how communities across the country are accomplishing both those aims through crowdfunding. Perhaps you’ve never heard of crowdfunding before; perhaps you’re wondering whether this approach might capture interest in your community. Here’s a chance to learn more about crowdfunding: how it works and how you could make it work for you. This overview will cover everything from the types of projects crowdfunding can support to best practices for planning a crowdfunding campaign. Throughout the session, hear examples from communities that successfully crowdfunded for projects ranging from traditional parks and community gardens to more out-of-the box ideas such as river rapids and greenspace between two highways.
Ebrahim Varachia, President and Co-Founder, Patronicity, California


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Manuel Spiller grew to love Barefoot Paths in his native Germany. As the name suggests, Barefoot Paths encourage users to walk barefoot. Very adaptable to their environments, the trails include various components that add challenge, help develop physical literacy, educate about environmental issues, promote local art, and/or deliver a fun experience to children and adults alike. Using real-life examples, Manuel will highlight the trails’ potential challenges, cost and value. He will describe the different varieties of Barefoot Paths, which can range from small interactive beautification projects to long, rugged, adventurous trails through forests. Learn how specific components can be incorporated to foster physical literacy or environmental education. Experience a small barefoot challenge with varied surfaces as well as a dexterity component. There will also be time for feedback, questions, and concerns.
Manuel Spiller, Parks Staff, City of Sarnia


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Persons with dementia are among the most stigmatized in society, suffering exclusion, isolation and a loss of self-worth. Yet they have a right to equal participation in recreational, leisure, and sporting activities under the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disability. Despite worldwide calls for action, implementation and evaluation of dementia-friendly leisure programs lags. Prompted by Dementia-Friendly Community initiatives as well as individual inquiries about golf, the City of Kitchener developed a unique Golf-Fore-Life Program to support persons with dementia who have an interest in golf. Participants in the program attended two sessions a week at two municipal golf courses. At each session, they were paired with caddies for a practice session and up to nine holes of golf, receiving individual coaching, encouragement, and prompts. Evaluations involving semi-structured interviews with staff members, participants, and care partners found an increase in physical, social, and emotional well-being after the program. Participants with dementia felt valued, developed new friendships, and felt a greater connection to staff and to the community. Golf staff members cited the beneficial role the program played in educating others, challenging stigma, being inclusive, and creating a dementia-friendly community. The Golf-Fore-Life model could be adopted by other municipalities and in other sports activities to better support persons with dementia and promote dementia-friendly communities.
Karen Thompson, Research Assistant, University of Waterloo; Bethany Pearce, Supervisor - Older Adults Services, City of Kitchener


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Many influences are impacting community recreation centre programming and design. What is working well? What will continue as best practices in state-of-the-art recreation centre design? More importantly, what are the trends—what’s on the way out and what’s coming in? Think outdoor fitness, pickleball, virtual and interactive fitness, e-Sports, multigenerational sport, choreographed environments. This session will keep you ahead of the curve and suggest innovations that promise immediate gain for your department. Learn to identify the intentions and solutions behind “game changing” recreation design innovations focused on fitness, aquatics, and more. Discover ways to solve key programming and operational challenges. Engage in lively and thoughtful conversations that promise to inform the design and programming of your new or existing recreation centre.
Mick Massey, Texas Regional Director, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture; Kevin Armstrong, Principal, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture, USA


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Abuse, discrimination, and harassment might be making sports headlines, but there is hope that the future will tell a different story. A big cultural shift is happening in Ontario, and the Safe Sport Ontario Task Force is at the forefront, leading a coordinated effort to promote and support safe sport for all. Learn about the progress the task group is making and find out what resources are available to enhance sport in your community. Recreation has a vital role to play in both delivering programs and operating facilities. Let’s make sport safe for all.
Jeremy Cross, Executive Director, Coaches Association of Ontario; Diane English, Director, Public Policy and Communications, Parks and Recreation Ontario


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Measuring the outcomes and impact of programs and services is integral to success in our results-based recreation environment. And for good reason: impact measurement can lead to growth opportunities. As competition for funding increases, more donors and supporters are looking for tangible and measurable outcomes. This session will explore some of the measurement strategies and approaches being used at Boys and Girls Clubs across Canada, including a three-pronged approach to quality measurement in Ottawa. While these measurement tools are employed to ensure consistency in program quality, they also open a window for donors and supporters to see the impact of their investments. The session will include time for open dialogue about approaches being offered across Ontario and beyond to measure program quality and outcomes.
Adam Joiner, Director of Programs, Boys and Girls Club of Ottawa; Denise Silverstone, Director of National Programs and Services, Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada

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Software for registering participants in recreation programs has seen so many changes in recent years that it’s hard for any one municipality to keep up. Join this roundtable to share your registration software experiences with colleagues, and to learn from them. Whether you are staying with a longstanding vendor or have moved to a completely new platform, this is your opportunity to cross-fertilize best practices as well as learn about how others are going live and addressing needs. Bring your questions, thoughts, and suggestions to this interactive facilitated conversation, and take home strategies for making program registration the best it can be for users and staff alike.
Facilitated by Marion Price, Chair, Recreation Registrations Software Working Group, Management Information Systems Association


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Outdoor exercise can help combat some of the lifestyle factors that are causing a crisis of ill health and obesity: screen time, overscheduled calendars, and more. Properly designed obstacle courses can help communities get healthier by providing a place to gather and by encouraging physical activity—including strength and mobility training. What’s more, obstacle courses become destinations, drawing people from outside the area to the community. After reviewing the importance of exercise and recapping why our communities are lagging in health and happiness, this session will cover how and why obstacle courses appeal to so many. You’ll also take home pointers about design: how to select an appropriate site, what to include, which standards too follow, ways to address safety concerns, and how and why different exercises combine to create the best possible use of a space.
Jill Hagen, Regional Sales Manager, BCI Burke, Wisconsin



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Take a trip abroad and discover how communities in the United Kingdom are bringing services to vulnerable people and increasing resident engagement in healthy lifestyles. This presentation will share how mobile outreach initiatives, targeted towards users of low-income grocery stores, invites shoppers to take a free health check. From there, residents can participate in a six week course that gradually introduces physical activity, information on healthy eating, and tips on how to be more active every day in small but meaningful ways. Legend’s Active Outcome Solution tracks results and shows how nearly 90% of those involved chose to register for ongoing local programs after the six week course. Analysis of data collected demonstrates a monetized social return on investment (SROI) for the community and provides evidence to validate the benefits of parks and recreation services to funders and decision-makers.
Sean Maguire, Managing Director, Legend Recreation Software; Jeremy Ham, Vice-President, Canada, Legend Recreation Software


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When community expectations are high but you don’t have huge amounts of money, sometimes you get it right—and other times, not so much. Using a case study, this presentation tells the tale of an older multi-purpose recreation facility that has been added onto over the years. Find out how these additions have played out in terms of usable space, community access, energy efficiency, and more. Then, through a pictorial overview, take a stroll outside the facility to see what changes have been made, hear about community response to the changes, and view plans for future development. In this no-holds-barred session, you’ll hear the good, the bad, and the “did we really do that?” scenarios.
Rick Cox, Director of Recreation, Culture & Parks, Town of Tillsonburg


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What are the real-world opportunities and limitations of gathering data through mobile device tracking in public spaces and facilities? Find out how the Town of Newmarket navigated the journey of installing one of Canada’s earliest smart city sensor networks. Newmarket was the first community in Canada to introduce a network of solar-powered smart benches. Designed by Soofa and installed in the downtown core and in an urban park, the smart benches, along with a pilot project within a major recreational facility, help track and manage everything from the number of people attending a recreational event or using a park to garbage pickup and maintenance schedules. Newmarket is using this data-driven technology to identify historical trends and enhance service delivery, with the goal of improving overall quality of life. Presenters will share lessons learned about costs, funding, navigating privacy issues, introducing the technology to the public, and more.
Mark Agnoletto, Strategic Business Leader, Town of Newmarket; Susan Chase, Director, Innovation & Strategic Initiatives, Town of Newmarket


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As a service provider, you want to ensure that quality is embedded in every program you offer—and in every policy and procedure guiding your operations. Across Canada, HIGH FIVE sets the quality standard for children's programs. Attend this session to learn about the new model of HIGH FIVE for 2020. Grounded as always in the Principles of Healthy Child Development, HIGH FIVE 2020 offers new modules to accompany and complement your staff training needs. It also includes ways to apply Principles of Healthy Aging with fitness staff, recreation staff, and volunteers. New online versions of QUEST 1 and QUEST 2 are also available, designed to streamline your tracking processes. Come learn! Bring any questions you may have about this exciting new chapter in the journey toward quality recreation programs, policies, and procedures.
JaimeLynn Nowbari, Senior Coordinator, HIGH FIVE Training and Stakeholder Engagement, Parks and Recreation Ontario


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How do you keep your recreation centre cutting-edge? It’s the age-old question. The rapid advance of technology makes it nearly impossible for a municipality to keep its facilities and systems at the forefront. This session focuses on the many ways technology impacts your centre and suggests ways to successfully plan for technological integration in all programmed areas of a building—not just in a holistic way but also in an adaptable way. Learn how to identify the technology trends impacting recreation programming and facility design; to anticipate and adapt programming and design in light of those trends; to develop an adaptable technology plan that invites ongoing integration of technology trends. Take home ideas for using technological advances in your own planning and operations, fitness, aquatics, community spaces, and active adult programming. Equip yourself to use technology to change the way people use your recreation centre.
Mick Massey, Texas Regional Director, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture; Kevin Armstrong, Principal, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture, USA


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Let’s play! This Tennis Canada session will highlight innovative partnership models that can be used to create affordable and accessible year-round recreation opportunities for all community members. Through its Municipal Tennis Facilities Strategy and Partnership Framework, Tennis Canada aims to help build stronger, more active communities through accessible tennis. Session leaders will share extensive research on the current inventory of municipal tennis infrastructure as well as economically viable operating models and best practices from across the tennis industry. Learn from municipalities that have already achieved success with year-round tennis using sustainable and cost-effective operating models. See how tennis can be integrated with other sports and activities, such as pickleball. Take home examples of the most successful partnership, operating, and programming models for covered tennis court facilities, all bundled for your use and reference. Consider how you might partner to introduce a diverse inter-generational programming model that meets the needs of multiple members of your community, regardless of abilities or aspirations.
Anita Comella, Senior Director, Facilities Development, Tennis Canada; Steve Palmer, Manager, Sport and Recreation, Town of Milton


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The Town of Newmarket is the 14th Bee City in Canada. Discover what it takes to become a Bee City, and why Newmarket made that commitment. Learn how to devise a Bee City action plan and what reporting is required. Hear how the community is following through on its commitment by creating new gardens, planting particular species, erecting bee houses, and hosting events to encourage both adults and children to expand pollination habitat. What’s next on the Newmarket bee agenda? Find out here. Glean ideas that just might make your own municipality more bee-autiful as well.
Ruurd van de Ven, Forestry Supervisor, Town of Newmarket; Nick Evans, Parks Supervisor, Town of Newmarket


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Meaningful engagement with Indigenous communities is a big step forward on the path to reconciliation. Key to developing a long-lasting relationship is understanding that engagement is not a “one size fits all” endeavour. Equally important is a strength-based approach that focuses on community assets and capitalizes on local knowledge, expertise, and vision. This approach encourages sustainability by empowering communities to take ownership over project direction, prioritization, and resource allocation. Non-Indigenous community organizations have roles to play in supporting community resilience by increasing accessibility to programs and leadership training—and by remembering to work with Indigenous communities, not for them. Attend this session to learn how both Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities can begin to work together, identifying strengths and needs and sharing strategies for effective collaboration. What steps should be taken to plan a viable Indigenous community engagement strategy? What training do staff need to prepare for engagement? What relationship models might inform the work? Gain insights that allow you to begin developing your own Indigenous engagement strategy.
Lesley Anne Morley, Indigenous Community Outreach Coordinator, Canadian Red Cross

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In four years together at the British Columbia Recreation and Parks Association, presenters Rebecca Tunnacliffe and Janet Rerecich have instituted many components large and small to create a workplace that reflects the values of the recreation and parks sector. They have led a shift in culture from a focus on being a non-profit organization to a member association whose 13 staff members live the brand. Individually and collectively, staff now contribute to the following shared purpose: “To lead the enrichment of individuals and their communities through the power of recreation and parks.” Discover how the duo used HIGH FIVE principles to shift the work culture, and pick up concrete ideas to implement with your team. You’ll also have opportunity to begin drafting a plan for your own workplace.
Rebecca Tunnacliffe, Chief Executive Officer, British Columbia Recreation and Parks Association (BCRPA); Janet Rerecich, Director, Education & Initiatives, BCRPA



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Enjoy lunch while networking with colleagues and hear about upcoming leaders of tomorrow and celebrate the leaders of toay as the Academic, PRO Member and HIGH FIVE Trainer Awards are presented.





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What makes an effective sponsorship pitch—a pitch that will generate revenue and develop meaningful relationships? Many years in sports broadcasting taught Michelle Farrugia about the confidence and customization needed to reel in the right sponsors. Michelle will describe how to frame and shape a pitch so that it is a good fit or both parties, how to effectively listen to sponsors’ wants and needs, how to negotiate and renew contracts more easily. Discover how Michelle increased event sponsorship from $5k to $85k in one year, and view sample pitches as well as sample mockup designs for real naming rights partners. Early in her broadcasting career, Michelle realized that being a woman in sports can be very challenging. Knowing that, her session will also touch on helping female staff develop a confident approach in a male dominated industry.
Michelle Farrugia, Manager of Advertising and Sponsorship Sales, Town of Whitby


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Join CPRA Chief Executive Officer CJ Noble to learn what has happened and will be happening in parks and recreation at the national level. CPRA and its provincial and territorial (PT) partners have been working on Parks for All, the Parks Task Force, Green Jobs federal funding, an online national knowledge platform, the Canadian Infrastructure Report Card, and the CPRA Professional Development Program. Funding received from Sport Canada to support women and girls in recreation and sport programs is fueling several initiatives: PRO will lead in updating the HIGH FIVE Sport resource to more fully reflect this target group; other PTs are developing workshops on promising practices with women and girls in sport. This work includes a five-part webinar series for community recreation sport professionals, practitioners, and volunteers that will teach practices and strategies for retaining girls and women in sport in their communities as well as grants are also available to scale up successful sport interventions. In addition to an overview of these initiatives, this session will present information on promising practices for recruiting and retaining women and girls in sport.
CJ Noble, Chief Executive Office, Canadian Parks and Recreation Association


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As of January 1, 2019, all municipalities (except lower tier) must create and implement Community Safety & Well-Being (CSWB) plans using the framework and parameters of the provincial Police Services Act. Although the Town of Ajax was not mandated to implement a CSWB plan, the Town decided early in the process to develop an Ajax-specific strategy using the provincial framework, to participate in the regional strategy, and to invite other local lower tier municipalities to observe and participate in the process. As a municipality that has been committed to the ongoing development and support of community safety and well-being, the Town has had a successful, collaborative, partnership-based safety plan for the last 11 years. All municipal departments are consistently involved, and formalized partnerships now exist with partners such as police service, school boards, boards of trade, the provincial transportation ministry, local transit, public health, social service agencies, mental health centres, and hospital. This session will share the process of developing the strategy as well as early outcomes. It is designed as an educational seminar with practical tools for municipalities to use within their own safety planning. The need for community-led safety and well-being initiatives, whether legislatively mandated or not, makes this a unique and timely learning opportunity for stakeholders who wish to implement their own strategies or improve their existing frameworks.
Cayla S. Da Silva, Community Development Coordinator, Town of Ajax; Cristina Ferrera, PhD Candidate, University of Ontario Institute of Technology


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Children with disabilities are benefiting from a huge growth in inclusive recreation programming, across Ontario and beyond. As with any rapid growth, communities are experiencing challenges and opportunities along the way. Learn from their journey as a panel of university experts shares the latest insights from research on communicating with families with children with disabilities. Take away innovative approaches to enhance your inclusive camps and programs.
Moderator: Diane English, Director, Public Policy and Communications, Parks and Recreation Ontario; Christa Costas-Bradstreet, Director, Partnerships, Active Living Alliance for Canadians with Disabilities


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Recognizing the impact of family violence on the brains and bodies of children and youth, the Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada has developed the Bounce Back League (BBL), a program for 9- to 12-year-olds. BBL uses what is best about sport (games, fun competition, leagues, tournaments) and the power of being part of a team to equip youth to better handle the ups and downs of life. This “trauma-informed” program adapts the most effective and cutting-edge clinical and academic work on childhood trauma and healing to fit within Boys and Girls Club culture. The program includes training to equip staff to create a trauma-informed, inclusive, safe culture across all of the organizations’ programming. Join us in learning about the brain, about trauma, and about how sports can be a safe space to help youth develop the resiliency skills they need to be successful. Learn from the experience and evaluations of the clubs running BBL in after-school programs and see how a trauma-informed approach can be incorporated into a wide variety of community-based programs. This interactive workshop will provide concrete tools you can use to begin to use a trauma-informed approach in your own programming.
Janath Vesna, Manager, National Programs, Boys and Girls Clubs of Canada


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Who pays for parks infrastructure? In the Town of East Gwillimbury, the blend of funding sources includes development charges—fees levied on new development to help offset the cost of servicing growth. Find out how East Gwillimbury used a Development Charges Background Study to inform a system that now provides revenues to pay for growth-related capital infrastructure. This duo of presenters will outline current policies, describe the financial agreements negotiated with various developers, explain how outdoor recreation charges are leveraged to help fund new infrastructure, and share case studies showing how the financing model has enabled the town to upgrade existing parks.
Frank Mazzotta, Manager of Parks Development and Operations, Town of East Gwillimbury; Carolyn Brown, Manager of Development Finance, Town of East Gwillimbury


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The work of developing future leaders needs to start young. Leadership skills do not spontaneously pop out at age 16 or 18, but must be fostered through a variety of experiences. Individuals take different paths to leadership; knowing that, communities need to offer a range of opportunities at various ages and stages. Many of today’s municipal employees gained experience in community centres, others with youth day camps, others through aquatic leadership. Whatever the path, it all started with their experiences in programs as children. There they began to lay the foundation of transferable leadership skills: creativity, persuasion, communication, collaboration, adaptability, and time management. This session will demonstrate how communities can build leaders through community programs that help youth gain skills that truly support their future endeavors, whether within the community framework or beyond.
Lesley Anne Morley, Indigenous Community Outreach Coordinator, Canadian Red Cross


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Improving efficiency is something we all continuously seek to do in our recreation roles. This session will take you through a City of Hamilton efficiency journey that resulted in a program cancellation process 70% more efficient than the previous approach. City staff used Lean Six Sigma Green Belt techniques and consulted with staff at multiple levels to inform the process, which zeroed in on cancellations caused by circumstances outside civic control, including foul weather and staff absence. Find out how the team employed critical thinking, analytical skills, and wise facilitation to succeed, using tools such as scamper brainstorming, decision-making (PICK) charts, and Value Stream Mapping.
Melissa Dale, Manager, District 4 Recreation Operations, City of Hamilton; Laura Rolph, Recreation Supervisor, City of Hamilton


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As communities deal with fluctuating populations, aging facilities, and calls for new construction, a plan must be in place to ensure wise decisions. Residents demand recreation facilities, and for good reason. Such spaces foster healthy lifestyles and a sense of community. But given the inevitable constraints, choices must be made about what gets added to the mix. Do we need a pool or an arena? Can we refurbish and expand, or should we build new? This session offers strategies for key steps in the planning process. Glean valuable insights that will help you assess the need for additional recreation; identify the driving factors for choosing new, refurbished, or existing facilities; and determine real costs. Key design and operational elements will also be identified, including these: What is your client base? Who needs to be involved in the project? Can you work with a 3P partner? How green will you be? Who will operate the facility and pay the long-term operating costs?
Scott Bowron, President, Clear Aquatics; Lynn Loubert, Division Manager, City of London






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Competing requests and ongoing issues told staff and elected officials in Hamilton that historical facility allocation practices were not serving the current mix of sports and organizations. Seeking a solution for the many problems observed by staff and communicated by user groups, the City of Hamilton embarked on a two-year journey of analysis, research, and community engagement. Working collaboratively with other departments, Sport Services staff developed targets and evaluation opportunities that proved to be exactly the needed solution. The problem of competing requests for programmable sport assets is not unique among Ontario municipalities. This interactive presentation will invite you to learn from Hamilton’s journey and consider how the chosen solution might apply to your situation.
Steve Sevor, Manager, Sport Services, City of Hamilton; Karly Brush, Recreation Project Specialist, City of Hamilton


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What characteristics and skill sets make for effective coaching? What are the principles of leadership through coaching? What frameworks might guide you into becoming a transformative coach? This workshop invites you to expand your knowledge and reinforce your ability to facilitate transformative coaching communication processes in your workplace. Discover a systematic structure that supports successful, inclusive communication. Through dialogue that addresses real-life examples and workplace scenarios, learn how to lead by conducting conversations that build strong, collaborative relationships and set clear outcomes.
Norma McDonald-Ewing, Director, Employee Engagement and Development, Conestoga College


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“The best ideas are the borrowed ideas!” Honouring that wisdom, this session sets the stage for a roundtable of varied rural ideas and success stories that you can “R & D” (repeat & duplicate). A perennial highlight for communities under population 15,000, this is a time to share and multiply rural parks, recreation, and culture initiatives. Small-town parks and recreation departments are the “melting pot for everything,” from condo developments to airports, municipal buildings, and entrance signs. Expect to trade ideas for age-friendly trails, community “eyes & ears” initiatives, waterfront parks, bike-friendly action, tourism services, partnerships, emerald ash borer action, and much more. Tweak, borrow, or replicate the examples in your own rural community! Session leaders have worked their entire career in rural municipal services and are looking forward to sharing their insights.
Shawn Everitt, Director of Recreation, The Town of Blue Mountains; Jayne Jagelewski, Director of Community Services, Town of Saugeen Shores; Sherri Walden, Director of Parks, Recreation & Culture, Town of Hanover


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What does it take to create a comprehensive, farsighted urban forestry management plan? Discover how and why the Town of Newmarket tackled the challenge of creating a plan for not only maintaining but enhancing its forest over two decades. Arm yourself with knowledge about the benefits of trees and the benefits of planning an urban forest. Find out how Newmarket accessed funding, set five- and 20-year goals, and plotted a strategy for increasing its tree canopy. Drill down into subunits of the plan such as keeping a tree inventory, establishing and planting trees, maintaining trees, protecting trees, fighting invasive species, managing noxious weeds, and engaging with your community. Become an informed advocate for trees, and watch your urban forest thrive.
Ruurd van de Ven, Forestry Supervisor, Town of Newmarket


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Electronic sports is exploding into a billion-dollar industry. Are you and your department ready for the e-Sports impact on community recreation? This session will explore the hard data and take an honest look at the issues involved in bringing e-Sports to your community centres and programs: space planning in an existing facility, design of a new facility, the legal implications, and more. The e-Sports wave is coming. It’s time to get in the game!
Mick Massey, Texas Regional Director, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture; Kevin Armstrong, Principal, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture, USA


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Communities around the world are recognizing that the Placemaking approach is revolutionizing development practices. By reflecting community history, needs, and aspirations, Placemaking creates authentic, multiuse destinations that have the potential to define the future identity of cities and communities. Using examples of communities built around public spaces, this session will highlight the impacts, value, methods, and processes of Placemaking. Find out how community led, community driven, community funded interventions can go far beyond simply building beautiful places.
Ebrahim Varachia, President and Co-Founder, Patronicity, California


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There is no Wi-Fi in this session, but the connections will be out of this world. Rarely do people move their bodies “their” way and feel safe and successful while doing so; in this session, you will. Discover, learn, experience how movement can nurture new levels of confidence and courage in your work, your life, and the community around you. In a world where social media has moved us apart, personal connection is key. Feel how creative movement can reduce stress and anxiety, increase self-awareness, improve mental health, nurture creativity—and connect you to others. Designed to invite staff and patron wellness experiences, this material includes positive messaging to support active, creative, interactive exploration. People who tackle challenges with an optimistic spirit, who see possibility in risk, who aren’t fearful of failure, can have a huge impact on others. In a world full of right and wrongs, when you move YOUR WAY the best part is, “You Can’t Get it Wrong!”
Michelle Hillier, Sessional Lecturer/Creative Director, Ontario Tech University, Experience Groove


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In these times of significant climate change, the desire for societal health, and the challenges associated with changing government and funding schemes, it’s imperative to gather as much knowledge to make informed decisions on new builds and retrofits. In this session, hear from those who have designed and built countless facilities for large, small, urban and remote communities. They have learned from others about how to create the best services during times of both innovation and constraint. They want to share these learnings with you as well as hear your thoughts and how to address the big issues around building in uncertain times. 
Philip Fenech, Principal, Perkins&Will; Andrew Frontini, Principal and Design Director, Perkins&Will; Principal, MJMA Architects



Networking Events



perfect mind

This is a special night as PRO celebrates the sector. In addition to recognizing PRO Award recipients, we also recognize Youth Friendly Communities and HIGH FIVE® Accredited Organizations. The theme for the evening will be a sparkling silver, recognizing PRO’s 25 years in supporting the parks and recreation sector. Wear your finest as pictures will be taken!



Fostering Resilience in the Face of Adverse Childhood Experiences: The Role of Community Recreation

It’s now known that adverse childhood experiences and developmental traumas such as neglect, abuse, poverty, and family dysfunction put children at risk. And that protective factors, including positive recreation experiences, help children build resilience as they grow into adolescence and adulthood. Receive the latest scientific insights in early brain development and current best practices and tools for fostering resilience in children, youth, and communities to help you identify and play protective role against early childhood adversity. Gain practical tools for identifying and measuring adverse childhood experiences and resilience. Participate in an interactive exercise to explore how risk and protective factors manifest themselves within recreation at various levels, from the individual child to family, program, institution, and community. Collaboratively develop a framework for building resilience within recreation that appropriately draws on the scope of each team member while considering the important principles of cultural safety, trauma-informed care, and compassion—including compassion for one’s self.

Panel Members:
Dr. Allison Crawford, Associate Chief, Outreach, Telemental Health and ECHO Ontario and Associate Professor, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH)
Dr. Priya Watson, Assistant Professor, Department of Psychiatry, CAMH
Kelvin Seow, Formerly District Manager, Parks, Forestry and Recreation, City of Toronto
Dr. David Mastey, Manager, Northern Psychiatric Outreach Program and Special Outreach Projects, CAMH

Keynote Address
The Transformation of Jeremiah Brown:From Novice to Olympian in Just Four Years

The world is full of change — some of it scary, some incredibly exciting. PRO and the parks and recreation sector have lived through change in the past 25 years, and there’s no doubt more change lies over the horizon. To cap off your PRO Forum experience, Jeremiah Brown recounts his inspirational journey of personal transformation and team unity — a journey accomplished in just four years. Jeremiah will share how he challenged common notions of what it means to lead (and to be led) in the pursuit of excellence. He’ll reflect on ways to stay the course when the pressure is on, especially in times of change. And he’ll recount how a healthy dose of self-compassion, humility, and just plain perseverance helped his real-life Olympic setbacks and failures take him to ultimate success. Jeremiah Brown will inspire and motivate you to set the stage for the transformation you want to see four years from now, and beyond.
Jeremiah Brown, Olympic Silver Medalist